News

Eugene Family YMCA Groundbreaking

The Eugene Family YMCA held a groundbreaking ceremony for the new 75,000-SF flagship facility which PIVOT Architecture is designing.

“This is special and unique for each of us,” said CEO Brian Stephan. “It shows we can dream big and create projects that seem might insurmountable. It will inspire our community for generations to come.”

“It takes a village of people to rise a Y,” joked Joe Carmichael, YMCA board president, alluding to the iconic “YMCA” song by the Village People.

In the new facility, the Y will be able to double the number of people it serves in its current building, built in 1955. It is designed to give the Y the ability to adapt spaces to fit its offerings which will increase the impact of its youth, health, and wellness programs for decades.

The new building will boast:
• Health & wellness areas including an indoor track and spin room
• A robust aquatics center with a lap pool, exercise pool, and splash pad for younger kids
• Activity centers for academic tutoring, maker spaces, and learning labs
• A teaching kitchen for nutritional and food preparation instruction
• Accessible, flexible floor plans that can change as needed
• The highest level of seismic standards so the building can serve as a community shelter after a disaster

The Eugene Family YMCA is the largest childcare provider in Eugene with afterschool care at 20 elementary schools with three more schools served at the Y facility.

Sabrina Parsons, chair of the Y’s capital campaign, said the new facility will help draw new residents looking at this area’s quality of life and improve Eugene’s “Y effect” as a center of the community.

The Y’s heath and wellness programs are some its most popular. Along with fitness, spin, and yoga classes, the Y has programs designed for cancer survivors, for those who suffer from chronic health conditions, a diabetes prevention program, and programs for seniors.

The facility is being built by Chambers Construction and is slated to open in December of 2023.

The PIVOT Y team strikes the “YMCA” pose on construction equipment.

News

Summer PIVOT Fellowship Applications Are Open

The days are short and the weather may be gloomy, so now is a perfect time to think about summer.

The application process is open for the summer 2023 PIVOT Fellowship in which one UO student is selected to work on a project of their choosing and be integrated into the PIVOT team. It is a paid position that runs from June until September.

The PIVOT Fellowship is open to BARCH, BIARCH, MARCH, and MIARCH students for the summer preceding their final year of study at the University of Oregon.

Applications are due March 6.

Learn more about and apply for the Fellowship.

News

Upper McKenzie Fire Station Out For Bid

The Upper McKenzie Rural Fire Protection District replacement station is now out to bid. The bids will be opened January 24 at 2 p.m.

The 2,800-SF station and related site work in Blue River, OR will replace the facility destroyed by the 2020 Holiday Farm Fire. The new facility will include two apparatus bays, a turnout room, office space, a mechanical room, restrooms, a training room, and other spaces.

The design team includes Branch Engineering, KCL Engineering, Dougherty Landscape Architecture, and Construction Focus.

For more information about the project or the bid, email info@pivotarchitecture.com or call 541.342.7291.

https://oregonbuys.gov/bso/external/bidDetail.sdo?docId=S-R20943-00005257&external=true&parentUrl=close

 

News

2022 PIVOT Fellowship: The City Squiggle

For the 2022 Fellowship, we tried something different. Rather than bringing in an architecture or interior architecture student, 2022 PIVOT Fellow Matilda Jereza was entering her last year studying product design.

Matilda’s project was born out of a desire to explore whether amenities like the transit shelters PIVOT designs could be employed to improve the pedestrian experience outside of transit systems.

“Altogether it was an extremely enriching experience to see a project through of my own design, with the support and input of my peers,” she said.

Matilda took a tried-and-true systematic approach in tackling her project by identifying a need, exploring the opportunities and challenges, as well as researching the target market, competitors, and constraints to develop her project objectives.

The result is what she calls The City Squiggle, an easy-to-install, solar-powered shelter of precast concrete arches that can be placed together in any quantity to form a “squiggle.” The resulting memorable and whimsical shelter provides protection from rain, sun, and enables users to charge devices.

Read more about The City Squiggle.